He Said/She Said: Behind the Lens

He Said/She Said: Behind the Lens

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Sharing a camera while traveling has taught us unique insights on how each other sees the world.  When looking through the lens it is just as important what is left out as to what’s included.   Sharing thus becomes an exercise in restraint as well as learning about how we each see the world.  Here are the things we’re each learned, focus on, and the time sharing frustrates us.

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HE SAID…

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Nothing has proved to me that women are from Venus and men from Mars more than sharing a camera while traveling.  LOCAVORista and I differ not only in what we photograph, but also how we do it.  When you see street photos of people on LivingIF it’s most likely taken by LOCAVORista.  When you see wider angle shots of larger scenes it’s more likely mine.  Snapshots of ourselves tend to be forced by LOCAVORista as she claims that if I had my way we’d have no photos of ourselves.  Matching our personalities to a “T” we photograph the world we see, or how we want to see it.  She sees beauty in the world of human activity while my eyes are attracted to the larger-than-life still scenes.

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The biggest differences in our photography are personality driven.  I still shoot as though I’m using film, trying to compose a shot to minimize exposures.  I immediately review and delete photos on the camera, ensuring that I am only keeping the images that portray the subject the way I wanted at that moment.  On the other hand, LOCAVORista has embraced that digital photos cost nothing to shoot: she takes 10 photos for every one of mine.  She keeps them all until she can see them on the computer.  Summing up the differences in our personalities, LOCAVORista doesn’t want to miss anything, taking a photo of everything she sees, while I release the shutter on pictures that illustrate what I’m thinking.

Combining the differences in our personalities and eyes provides us a rich portfolio of diverse images.  With both of us free to shoot the world as we see it we’re able to produce a more complete view of the world we are traveling.  Sharing photography this way has made visual our difference and how we complement each other.

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SHE SAID…

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I took all the photo classes offered in high school with aspirations of becoming a National Geographic photographer. After spending time with a professional photographer I don’t think that National Geographic is in my future, however, I still work to tell a story or portray an emotion with my photos.  I use photography as one of my creative outlets on this trip.

As I have written before one of the things I have learned on this trip is how logical my husband is. The lack of emotion comes through in his photography, he’s a documenter and shoots with more of a journalistic style.  While I like to capture people in their every day lives and snap photos of the amazing people we meet.  I still regret that we don’t have a picture of every couchsurfer we’ve stayed with or pictures of us from some of the world’s most iconic places.  Many of our pictures of landscapes and cityscapes are breathtaking, but they don’t capture a feeling or share the subtle beauty of a place with you.  This is hard to do, but it’s what I strive to capture when I am behind the lens.

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How could you not take photos of these cute children?

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I still take my fair share of landscape shots and thinkCHUA will pull out the camera for a people shot now and then.  However, our personalities and our pictures reflect our experiences on the trip as well as how we remember them.  For that reason I’m glad that we don’t have the same photographic style, not only does it save fights over the camera, but it allows us to have a more comprehensive photo album from each place we have been.

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YOUR TURN: While traveling with another person have you noticed differences in photography?  What were they?  What did you learn about the person from what they took photos of?  Share with us in the comments.


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Comments

» Bka :
Jun 27, 2012

I think I could have written this blog!….having said that, there remains such beauty and symmetry in your differences…..your photos are treasures enjoyed by many….no clue what one does with 150,000 photos, but than that is for another day…peace….bka

LOCAVORista Reply:

Dad, thanks for the compliments on our photos. We are still unsure of what to do with all of our photos, but we have gotten better at deleting photos that we don’t want.

» Donna :
Jun 27, 2012

Yeh, I have to weigh in on this discussion for sure, being an aging but aspiring stock photographer wannabe. I find that I get more creative in my photos when I travel alone because I move at my own pace. If I see something worth waiting for, I wait until I get the shot. Traveling with others, especially when we only have THREE WEEKS :-))))) … we tend to keep trucking and not always stop for those special shots because we’re moving too fast to see them. On the other hand, having two sets of eyes to notice intricate details of architecture or a cute kid with a puppy just down that little street is also valuable!

What to do with all those photos after? No clue! But most will sit on the computer hard drive and when we kick the bucket it will be all that much easier for the kids to just hit the delete button! If they opt to view them first, that’s their problem. :-)

Donna

LOCAVORista Reply:

Donna, I agree, I enjoy going out and doing some shooting on my own to really capture what I want in my photos. It’s also really fun to find a good spot to sit and just snap pictures of life going by and/or the people you meet. That’s how I have gotten some of my favorite shots and now I have amazing photo memories of people I met along the way.

» Claudia :
Jul 10, 2012

Sharing A camera … I think you are very brave. My husband and I shoot together all the time but with separate cameras (he’s Canon, I’m Nikon). We find it really interesting and very rewarding as we are often standing only feet apart and we return home with very different perspectives on what most people would say is the same scene. We like to say, that typically, he’s Mr. Wide Angle and I’m Ms. Macro/Telephoto. He’s really embraced HDR and I hold reality dear. Shooting people, I tend to shoot the very young or very old, he shoots beautiful young things. The variety is wonderful, learning from one another is invaluable, and the stories we bring home in our images seem endlessly different. We love it, but I think working with the same camera, just might be a challenge our differences coudn’t mount. How do you do it?
Read Claudia’s awesome post Wedding Bells No Blues

LOCAVORista Reply:

Claudia, honestly I don’t really know how we have survived so long fighting over one camera. You are right, when you shoot together you do learn a lot from each other and about each other, which makes the sharing worth it. But someday when we aren’t on a budget trip around the world we will both have a camera.

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About the Author

thinkCHUA: Photographing and documenting the world on a 3 year round-the-world trip to help future travelers discover new places, travel longer and enjoy the world's great experiences.

About the Author
thinkCHUA: Photographing and documenting the world on a 3 year round-the-world trip to help future travelers discover new places, travel longer and enjoy the world's great experiences.
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